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Lincolnshire Outdoor Family Portraits

I managed to shoot some Lincolnshire outdoor family portraits between lockdowns and tier restrictions. I’m quite happy shooting family portraits in my studio but location photography is what I’ve been doing throughout my 36 years as a press photographer. A typical job for The Times involves me travelling to a location new to me to shoot a person I haven’t met before and creating a strong page-leading shot for publication. Outdoor family portraits are not that different especially as all my newspaper shoots now have to taken outside anyway during the pandemic.

I find the variable lighting more an opportunity than challenge. The studio may offer a completely controlled environment (and it’s warm and dry) but I still prefer controlling daylight and introducing supplementary lighting (usually flash). Throw in a dramatic location or sky and we’re really getting there. As an aside, I am still offering one to one photography tuition vouchers on my site.

I spent a morning in December shooting Lincolnshire outdoor family portraits in a village near Lincoln. I immediately spotted a wonderful field with mature trees and traditional stock control fencing. Here’s a picture I particularly like shot with very powerful flash using a gold reflector and the low morning sun as backlight. I shot lots of tight family portraits and smiling faces too but this is my favourite and I now have a framed A2 print on display in my studio. It’s the sort of page-leading shot I might take for The Times.

To book your Lincolnshire outdoor family portraits please contact me here.

 

Lincolnshire family portraits of brother and sister sitting on fence in field.

©Michael Powell

Last Minute Christmas Gift – Photography Tuition

Here’s a great last minute Christmas gift idea, give a photography tuition voucher. I’ve been doing one-to one photography tuition sessions for about ten years now. Learn how to stop that camera bossing you around and how to control it and understand light and composition better. Order at michaelpowell.com

 

Powell_Photography_tuition voucher

 

 

Covid-19 Weddings – Photography Coverage by the hour

 

Pic shows champagne glasses overlaid with postponed rubber stamp text

 

Covid-19 weddings rules have effectively shutdown wedding ceremonies in UK until further notice. Weddings are being postponed and cancelled. My diary has melted. So here comes a new simplified Covid-19 weddings photography option.

Wedding photographer now unavailable for your new date?
Downscaled your wedding? Expecting just a dozen guests?
Last minute wedding plans for when weddings are back?
Worried about a possible second lockdown?
Midweek availability only at venue?
Register office wedding?
Wedding this year and a big party next year?

NEW COVERAGE BY THE HOUR
£250 per hour (min 2 hours)
£200 per hour thereafter
Retouched hi-res pictures via download link
Option to upgrade to book later

For further details please contact me here.

Of course I’ll be operating responsibly, safely and adhering to guidelines and best practice. I’ve not been rusting away these last few months. I’m also a press card carrying newspaper photographer so have been able to continue working responsibly during lockdown.

Hopefully it won’t be long until I can start photographing scenes like these.

 

 

Covid golf restrictions have been eased

The very first golfers to play at Market Rasen Golf Club in Lincolnshire after lockdown restrictions were relaxed for the sport

Covid golf restrictions have been eased in England so I went down to Market Rasen Golf Club on a beautiful morning to photograph the very first two ball of Keith Borst and Ted Cruttenden who teed off at 8am. The new English Golf Union covid golf guidance includes: not touching the flagstick, using clubs and feet to smooth bunkers, tee time bookings, one and two balls only, arrival for play just in time, changing shoes in the car park, hole liners in the cup, removal of seating and ball washers and more spaced tee time slots.

The very first golfers to play at Market Rasen Golf Club in Lincolnshire after lockdown restrictions were relaxed for the sport
Golf courses have reported huge demand though the three day notice of openings has clearly caught some courses out and staff have had to work very quickly to interpret and instigate new working practices. Some courses have been rather neglected where too many ground staff have been furloughed. Better staffed clubs have had a unique opportunity to make repairs and improvements during the growing season with no golfers to interrupt and increase wear and tear.

After filing the pictures I went out and played my first round in a long time at my club, Forest Pines and what a joy to finally walk down a fairway again.

The very first golfers to play at Market Rasen Golf Club in Lincolnshire after lockdown restrictions were relaxed for the sport

The very first golfers to play at Market Rasen Golf Club in Lincolnshire after lockdown restrictions were relaxed for the sport. Keith Borst plays the third hole.

Keith Borst plays the third hole.

The very first golfer to play at Market Rasen Golf Club in Lincolnshire after lockdown restrictions were relaxed for the sport. Keith Borst plays the sixth hole.

The very first golfers to play at Market Rasen Golf Club in Lincolnshire after lockdown restrictions were relaxed for the sport. Ted Cruttenden plays the fourth.

Ted Cruttenden plays the fourth.

 

Kellingley Colliery 1965-2015

Kellingley Colliery 1965-2015 On this day in 1965 Kellingley Colliery in North Yorkshire began production. When it closed in 2015 it had become the last deep coal mine in Britain. Just before its closure I spent a day photographing it for The Sunday Times. I have now added a gallery of the pictures to my website. Please click here to see them. I visited the site again recently with the hope of photographing what remained but sadly the answer is nothing. The two shafts have been capped leaving millions of pounds worth of specialist equipment deep underground forever. All the buildings including the offices and bath house have been demolished. However the memorial to the 17 workers who died at Kellingley Colliery 1965-2015 was saved and resisted to the National Coal Mine Museum for England.

 

Coal bound for Drax Power Station falls into a pile.

 

Bathman, Pete Armstrong.

 

Lampman Mark Bainbridge with Garforth safety lights used to detect methane underground.

 

Geotech Engineer, Dave Moore in the canteen.

Click here for a previous blog post on Kellingley Colliery.